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18.07.11 Festival ARTONOV 2018

It’s my pleasure to inform about Festival ARTONOV in 2018.
This festival is the bridge that brings visual arts, performing arts, space arts and music together. Its fourth edition takes place in Brussels and Lille in October. I perform with musicians in the historical monument, Villa Cavrois in Lille in France on October 27th.
 
“Calligraphies Sonores”
Hiroyuki Nakajima, calligraphy
Vincenzo Casale, historical clarinet
Jan Michiels, piano Bechstein 1890
Antoine Pecqueur, texts
 
You can see the complete program and participating artists on the website.
Program: http://festival-artonov.eu/en/programme-2018/
Artists: http://festival-artonov.eu/en/artists-bio/


Festival ARTONOV 2018

Festival ARTONOV 2018 Japanese calligraphy has influenced and continues to influence Western art, from music to painting and many other arts forms. It takes many years of practice to master Japanese calligraphy, and the immediacy of the gesture of writing makes it an art where the creative and performative gesture is very close. Western music and some musical instruments such as the bass clarinet from the late 1800s to the early 1900s, in the Japanese period, seem to be inspired by this art thanks to their design and the immanence of their artistic form. The sound which sometimes seems to have a more crude gesture than that of calligraphy, on the other hand has a preparation and a similar mastery.  If for Paul Klee, the line is a point that has gone for a walk, the walk of a brush in calligraphy could be a sensory journey beyond the boundaries of the image itself. Can we translate a sound into calligraphy and vice versa? The performance at Villa Cavrois will present a program which combines the calligraphic and musical gesture with the architecture of Robert Mallet-Stevens as part of the performance ritual. If architecture is defined as mute music by Goethe, then the architecture will be sculpted here as a sound calligraphy.
Japanese calligraphy has influenced and continues to influence Western art, from music to painting and many other arts forms. It takes many years of practice to master Japanese calligraphy, and the immediacy of the gesture of writing makes it an art where the creative and performative gesture is very close. Western music and some musical instruments such as the bass clarinet from the late 1800s to the early 1900s, in the Japanese period, seem to be inspired by this art thanks to their design and the immanence of their artistic form. The sound which sometimes seems to have a more crude gesture than that of calligraphy, on the other hand has a preparation and a similar mastery. If for Paul Klee, the line is a point that has gone for a walk, the walk of a brush in calligraphy could be a sensory journey beyond the boundaries of the image itself. Can we translate a sound into calligraphy and vice versa? The performance at Villa Cavrois will present a program which combines the calligraphic and musical gesture with the architecture of Robert Mallet-Stevens as part of the performance ritual. If architecture is defined as mute music by Goethe, then the architecture will be sculpted here as a sound calligraphy.
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